How has origami developed technology in New York?

How has origami developed technology in New York?

Posted on Jun 30, 2015
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How has origami developed technology in New York?

In case you missed it, earlier this month, an engineer from Binghamton University in New York developed an origami battery, costing only three pence, which uses bacteria to create energy.

If you thought that origami was the reserve of bored waiters folding napkins into crowns, or crafty-types with too much time on their hands then you should probably read on.

The paper-based, bacteria-powered battery harnesses microbial metabolism from just one drop of water. The innovation is designed to be used in resource-limited locations and can even make use of wastewater.

Using origami techniques, a 3D battery can be folded from a sheet and folded back to the size of a matchbook.

At the moment the battery is only powerful enough to run something small like an LED or a biosensor, but this is enough for the design to be attractive to experts working in disease control and prevention.

More than just cranes

A quick Pinterest search reveals a ream of amazing, innovative origami creations from people who have mastered the ancient art. From dresses and suits, to dragons and fruits, origami artists can fold and mould a modest piece of paper into something you want to gawp at.

There are a number of different paper-crafts but origami refers to the art of folding a square piece of paper into forms without using anything like scissors or glue sticks.

Origami is generally associated with Japan, but actually paper-folding has been part of European culture just as long. Even if you don’t remember making cranes or elephants when you were younger, you will no doubt have had a go at hats, boats, fortune tellers or even the humble paper plane.

There are a number of traditions associated with origami, one of the most widely practiced being the thousand origami cranes. This is exactly what you think it is – one thousand paper cranes strung together on string. Some legends say that any person who crafts this many cranes will be granted a wish, whereas other stories suggest that you are granted eternal good luck, long life or recovery if you are ill.

The story of Sadako Sasaki is often told when on this subject. Sadako was a Japanese girl who lived in Hiroshima and was only two when the bomb fell. She survived with no apparent injuries but was diagnosed with Leukaemia at the age of 11. When in hospital she heard the legend of the cranes and began folding, using whatever paper she could find. Some stories tell that she completed the task, but others suggest that she reached around 600 before her death at the age of 12 and that her friends completed the remaining cranes that she was buried with.

Why we like origami at flick

You may have noticed that as well as lightbulbs, we love origami.

The cool thing about origami is that it doesn’t take long to learn to make a simple piece, but it can get as intricate as you care to venture.

I’m not saying at flick that we’re going to be revolutionising disease control any time soon, but I’m pretty confident in our e-learning prowess. The principles of e-learning are pretty simple – taking some information or instruction and getting it out there to the people who need to know it – but really we can go much further than that, with engaging themes, playful animation, and a gamified approach. Custom flick allows you to keep it as simple as a paper boat, or go all out and tackle the origami elephant.

Take a look at our custom packages here to see if we can create something just for you. Or if you want to show off you origami skills then why not post us a pic? You can see our paper-plane competition below. What do you think? 

If you would like to find out more about our CPD certified training courses click here.

 

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